Blogging tools for blog post ideas

10 Essential Blogging Tools To Generate Blog Post Ideas

Have you ever found yourself struggling to come up with new ideas for content? Or wondered how to increase your blogging traffic? If so, then this blog post I’ve compiled some of the most essential blogging tools that can help you find new blog post ideas, create meaningful content and build a stronger brand.  They say no man is an island, and you can’t do …

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website visitors

How a little niche site got 50,000 website visitors in its first 2 weeks, without advertising

This is how to get website visitors for free. This experiment generated 50,000 unique visitors to one of my niche websites, in less than 2 weeks. I’ll show you how. Today you will learn: A new, effective website traffic generator Results from a traffic experiment How to get laser-targeted traffic …

Read moreHow a little niche site got 50,000 website visitors in its first 2 weeks, without advertising

X10 website traffic

The 10X Traffic Method

The 10X Traffic Method will teach you how to easily leverage authority figures, influencers, and thought leaders for mass exposure. You’ll ethically and legally borrow their credibility and redirect it towards your website, email list, or social media profiles. You can use this method to: Get more website traffic Build …

Read moreThe 10X Traffic Method

On page SEO

3 ways to boost your Google rank with advanced on-page SEO

You already know that on-page SEO is important.

You’ve taken the time to carefully selected the best possible keywords, you’ve created outstanding content you know people will love, you’ve made sure that your title is on point, got all the right sub-headings, and you’ve even got your alt tags down.

But you’re still not getting the ranking you deserve.

So what gives?

In this SEO tutorial you’ll learn about a vital piece of the Google algorithm that nobody told you about.

So today I’m going to walk you through it step by step and show you three ways to boost your Google ranking, with advanced on-page optimisation.

For best the results from on-page SEO efforts, we need to optimise our content for RankBrain.

What is Google RankBrain?

RankBrain is the third most important ranking signal, right behind backlinks and content.

SEO courses from pre-2015 won’t mention it because RankBrain didn’t formally exist until 2016.

In all, there are over 200 ranking signals and this is just one, albeit an important one.

For that reason, it’s vital to understand how RankBrain works and optimise our content properly.

Rankbrain is artificial intelligence that’s part of the core Hummingbird algorithm, designed to help Google understand the exact context of a search query.

For example, if you’re searching for ‘Jaguar’, RankBrain will figure out if you want to receive results about the Jaguar cars, the football team, or the wild animal (roar).

To do this, the algorithm uses LSI keywords.

What are LSI keywords?

Latent Semantic Indexing (LSI) is a set of additional relevant keywords that Google looks for to help understand the context of a piece of content.

For example, if your article is about ‘Jaguars’, then additional words like ‘roster’, ‘schedule’ and ‘stadium’ will help Google to figure out when it should serve your content to users.

We can structure our entire site using LSI, for example the categories could be relevant keywords.

But today we’re just concerned about on-page SEO, and not the internal link structure of website.

So I’m going to walk you through using this, and show you how to uncover the right words to use in your content.

For this, we’re going to use a technique called WAG.

The WAG Technique

As far as I know, the WAG technique was developed by Brian Dean, and it stands for:

  • Write
  • Ask
  • Google

We optimise our content around a long tail keyword, just as we normally would.

Ok, long tail keywords have become a contentious issue with some in the SEO industry, and Brian Dean once declared that long tail is dead as a result of RankBrain.

Back in the day it made sense to create hundreds of different pages… each one optimized around a different keyword.

For example, you’d create one page optimized for “best keyword research tool”. And another optimized for “best tool for keyword research”. 

And old Google would rank each of them for their respective long tail keywords.

Today, RankBrain understands that these terms are basically the same thing. So they show nearly identical search results.

Brian Dean, Backlinko

He instead encourages people to use medium tail keywords.

I still believe long tail keywords have a place in SEO.

But whatever approach you choose, we need to include the words that we know Google will expect to see, as part of our optimisation process.

So how do we find the right words to use?

I’ll show you. Open a new browser window and follow along.

Step 1: Use Google

Make sure you’re using an ‘Incognito’ browser for this to make sure we limit the amount of personalised search results, because Google tries to guess our intentions we need to get as close to a default search as possible.

Now search for your main keyword or phrase.

Let’s assume my article is about Jaguar cars so in this example I’m going to search for Jaguar.

On page SEO for RankBrain

Next I’m going to scroll down to the bottom of the SERPs and look at the ‘Searches related to’ section.

Here you’ll find a list of additional keywords you can include in your article, if they are relevant.

These are powerful words that Google is expecting to see in your content.

Google Related Keywords

Step 2: Using the SERPs

This is even easier than the first step, because we’re already on the SERP page.

All you have to do is look through the page for words in bold. These are perfect LSI keywords to add to your content.

In my example you can see the phrase ‘Jaguar XF’ is in bold. Google understands the content is ONLY about Jaguar cars.

Google RankBrain Bold

Step 3: Keyword Density Checker

This step is a little bit more involved, but simple nonetheless.

Here, we take the actual URL of the SERP and paste it into a Keyword Density Checker to find other words that Google expects to see.

For example, in my example we can see that the word ‘luxury’ appears multiple times in the SERPs, so this is another word we might want to include in our content – if it’s relevant.

Keyword Density Checker

Obviously don’t include stop words, and you should be good to go.

So now you’ve got another technique to help you improve your on-page SEO .

The Lazy Marketer’s Guide To Content Curation

Feeling lazy?

Can’t be bothered creating your own content today?

Well, you don’t have to; introducing the lazy marketer’s guide to content curation.

You see, 2 days ago I received an email recently from a Profit Copilot member who wanted to take a content marketing short cut. He was tempted to copy and paste articles from Ezine.com and use them on his website’s blog.

It’s an easy mistake to make.

Obviously, I encouraged him not to do this though, as copying and sharing unchanged content can be detrimental to his site… it’s kinda spammy.

The last thing you’ll want your visitors to think is that you are plagiarising, or otherwise using unoriginal articles, media, or other content.

So today, I’d like to offer you a much more efficient, quicker, and simpler method of content creation.

This is a technique called content curation which is often confused with another technique called content aggregation.

What’s the difference?

Content Curation vs Content Aggregation

Content curation happens when you take a small portion of someone else’s content and use it to create more content.

A good example of content curation is the Slashdot.com website.

Slashdot

However content aggregation on the other hand, is when you just take someone else’s content and use it “as is” on your own site/blog. There is a danger with this method because if it’s not done right then you risk plagiarising other people’s content which can negatively affect your site’s integrity and traffic, if you don’t link to the original and use a canonical tag.

A good example of content aggregation done right is the Alltop.com website:

Content aggregation doesn’t create extra value to your content and doesn’t offer anything new for the reader, or anything that they can’t find elsewhere. So, why would they want to keep coming back to your blog? This is where curation comes into play.

Not all of us are meant to be writers or bloggers, but luckily, there’s enough content already written on the web to be able to really collect and form into new pieces.

How To Curate Content

So how do you find content to curate?

  • Know what your audience wants
  • Find articles that will interest them
  • Copy and past a small portion of that article
  • Wrap it a block quote tag
  • Link to the original
  • Add your own unique thoughts and opinions

It’s that simple.

So let’s break it down in more details.

Start with finding relevant articles that your audience will appreciate. This is why knowing your audience is essential, otherwise nobody will care about the content you’re curating.

Then take a small portion of that article, a piece that you find particularly engaging or helpful, and paste it into a new blog post.

Then you’ll want to wrap this section in block quotes and link it back to its original source.

Add your own valuable insight on the topic and voila!

You’ve just created curated content that is unique to your blog. It’s a very easy process, but important to know and understand.

And as always, this article accompanies a video on my Profit Copilot YouTube channel, called Super-Fast Content Creation (above).

In the video, I found an article that I thought my audience might appreciate about the benefits of ‘affiliate marketing for advertisers’.

Content Curation

While it was a fairly lengthy piece, it was also numbered, which made this example much more organised and useful for the tutorial.

Content Curation 2

Since there were five different points with their own sections to cover, I copied all of the content and pasted it into a new WordPress blog post on my site.

Then I got rid of most of the extra text, outside of a sentence or so, for each point. I highlighted each of those sections and put them in block quotes as explained above, then added my own opinions and advice on the topics, as well as the hyperlink for the original source.

Content Curation

Something important to remember; be sure to change the original headline so that you’re still explaining the content, but you aren’t plagiarising the source article.

Save and publish, and you’re done!

This is as simple as it gets when it comes to content curation and creation. It’ll be a massive help in bringing traffic to your website or blog as well, but there are other methods you can learn as well. If you want to learn how to gain organic traffic and build a bigger following, be sure to go to profitcopilot.com/traffic and check out my absolutely free, no-strings-attached training course.